Food Street Markets in Hong Kong

Being a North American, the traditional food and produce market is a mostly foreign concept. Most of us in North America drive once a week to the supermarket for our food. In Vancouver, I guess we’re lucky enough to have places like the Granville Island Public Market and various farmers markets that introduce supermarket shoppers to the traditional market.

Hong Kong is full of old street markets. Although most of them are no longer truly on the street. Most of them have been moved into large multi-story buildings. The name street market still adorns most of the entrances, but it’s a “vertical street of sorts”

Central Market

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Climbing Up to Hong Kong’s Mid-Levels

Hong Kong Island is one very hilly place. Most visitors and tourists would only venture up the hillside to visit The Peak. Even then, most people would likely take The Peak Tram (which in itself is a tourist attraction). If you have an extended period of time, then it may be worthwhile to explore off the beaten path into non-touristy Hong Kong.

On this January Sunday, I was meeting up with an old high school classmate. I don’t think I had seen him since my university days in Vancouver. So it was a great chance to meet up with him and his wife. We had set a time to meet at the Starbucks at Park Road and Bonham Road. Okay. I’ve heard these street names, but I had no idea where it was. Thank goodness for Nokia Maps and their downloadable city maps.

On my map, I found the intersection and ran a straight line down from there to the tram line along Des Voeux Road. It happened to follow along a street called Eastern Street. This street would be the subject of my pre-meeting exploration.

Riding the tram along Des Voeux Road

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Hong Kong City Gallery

Here’s a very little known “museum” in Hong Kong. So little known that the place is eerily quiet for a Hong Kong facility. This is the City Gallery. The gallery isn’t expensive. In fact, it’s free. The gallery isn’t in the middle of nowhere. It’s right down in Central Hong Kong near the old City Hall. So why is it so quiet? I have no idea.

The first time I heard about the City Gallery was when one of my friends in Hong Kong visited the place. He tagged me in his Facebook photos and said that it would be the kind of place I would love to visit. How can I say no to a place that is meant to showcase a city, its infrastructure, and its urban development? That’s right up my alley.

I had walked over from the Legislative Council building in Admiralty. The City Gallery was directly in between Admiralty and Central stations. So it wouldn’t really have mattered which way I came. It was at least a 10 minute walk towards the waterfront from either station.

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The View from the Upper Deck

One of the great things of the Hong Kong transportation system is the ubiquitous double decker bus. They are as much a symbol of Hong Kong as they are a symbol of London. The ride is comfortable on the upper deck of these tall vehicles and offer a different view of the dynamic urban landscape that is Hong Kong.

In the tight urban spaces of Kowloon, the double decker literally offers a towering view of the people below. I feel almost like a voyeur peering into people’s lives without them realizing. I could create different stories of the people rushing along the busy streets.

Here I see a man carrying his daughter. He’s navigating the busy Kowloon sidewalk in hopes of getting his child to preschool on time.

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Hong Kong – Central Ferry Piers

What do you do when you’ve just witnessed your cousin bring the bride home for a traditional tea ceremony and you have a few hours to kill before the wedding banquet? I don’t know about you, but my sister and I went for a long walk down to the Hong Kong waterfront, namely the Central Ferry Piers.

(L) Macau Ferry Terminal, (C Back) FCC Tower, (R) Central Ferry Piers

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99 B Line Queuing Study

It looks like I was a part of a study and didn’t even realize it. Back in January, I had arrived at Broadway & Commercial as a part of my daily commute and was greeted with the bright yellow tape on the sidewalk leading up to the 99 B-Line stop. Signs were posted saying that it was part of queuing study for the B-Line. The B-Line has over 50,000 riders every day. It claims to be North America’s busiest bus route. I can believe that given the long lines that form every morning for the bus. The long lines persist even though the buses are as frequent as 2-5 minutes during rush hour.

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Losing the Vancouver Historic Streetcar

It looks like another piece of Vancouver history is disappearing. It’s unfortunate that the city is no longer going to support this fine piece of Vancouver history. I was fortunate enough to have ridden the streetcar a couple of years ago. It was a nice, idyllic ride from Olympic Village station to Granville Island. It was really the best way to reach Granville Island without a car.

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Queen Elizabeth Park on a sunny morning

Here’s another video. This time I had a little time on a sunny Thursday morning. It was pretty quiet in the park, but still some activity going on. I’m still trying to get used to filming with my Nokia Lumia 1020, though. It’s a little odd since the camera lens is actually left of centre when I hold the phone in landscape/horizontal orientation. Anyway, I hope you guys enjoy these little snippets of Vancouver.

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Tai Po Railway Museum

As a transit traveller, I inevitably find myself drawn to all things transportation. The Tai Po Railway Museum is a small, but perfectly affordable destination. Nothing is more affordable than free!

The Tai Po Railway Museum is actually the renovated station area of the Old Tai Po Railway Station. The station was built in 1913 and was converted to a museum in 1985 after the new Tai Po Market railway station was open. Although built in the 20th Century, the old station was built with Chinese architecture and ornamentation. Even the Chinese is meant to be read in the old, traditional right-to-left style.

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